Latin America

 

The United States has always had a special conception of its relationship with the nations of Latin America.

In the Cold War era the U.S. establishment feared socialism and in some cases overthrew or undermined democratically elected governments perceived at the time as becoming left-wing or unfriendly to U.S. interests. Examples include the 1954 Guatemalan coup d'état, the 1973 Chilean coup d'état and the support of the Nicaraguan Contras. The '70s and '80s saw a shift of power towards corporations, and a polarization of the political election systems of many of the Latin American nations. Recently, several left-wing parties have gained power through elections and have not been attacked. In particular Venezuela has been critical of U.S. foreign policy. Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Ecuador currently have governments sometimes seen as aligned with Venezuela. Left-wing governments in nations such as Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, and Uruguay are more centrist. The right-wing governments in Chile, Peru, and Colombia have closer relations with the U.S.

 

‚ÄĘ I think we should have better relationship with Latin American Countries¬† to work together for prosperity of our¬† future. We must work together regardless of religion, race, ethnicity or gender.

 

Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Puerto Rico
Uruguay
Venezuela
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